fbpx
Ethiopia: Loan from United Nations Fund Allows Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to Scale Up Fertilizers for Farmers in TigrayRead more How Choosing the Right Printer Helps Small Businesses and Content Creators to Save Time, Maximise Productivity and Achieve GrowthRead more The United States Contributes USD $223 Million to Help World Food Programme (WFP) Save Lives and Stave Off Severe Hunger in South SudanRead more Eritrea: World Breastfeeding WeekRead more Eritrean community festival in Scandinavian countriesRead more IOM: Uptick in Migrants Heading Home as World Rebounds from COVID-19Read more Network International & Infobip to offer WhatsApp for Business Banking Services to Financial Institution Clients across AfricaRead more Ambassador Jacobson Visits Gondar in the Amhara Region to Show Continued U.S. Support for the Humanitarian and Development Needs of EthiopiansRead more Voluntary Repatriation of Refugees from Angola to DR Congo ResumesRead more Senegal and Mauritania Are Rich in Resources, Poor in Infrastructure, Now Is the Time to Change That Read more

Google delays plan to phase out browser-tracking ‘cookies’

show caption
Google is delaying its plan to phase out the use of tracking software known as "cookies" in its Chrome browser to address privacy concerns./AFP
Print Friendly and PDF

Jun 25, 2021 - 09:17 AM

SAN FRANCISCO — Google said Thursday it was delaying plans to phase out the use of browser “cookies” for its ad targeting after drawing complaints over its replacement for the technology.

The phasing out of third-party cookies — bits of software that keep track of sites visited by users — will be pushed back into mid-2023 instead of late 2022 for the Chrome browser, Google said in a blog post.

“We need to move at a responsible pace,” said Google privacy engineering director Vinay Goel.

“This will allow sufficient time for public discussion on the right solutions, continued engagement with regulators, and for publishers and the advertising industry to migrate their services.”

Google has said the elimination of cookies is in response to privacy concerns. But critics said the new system devised by the internet giant poses a different set of privacy issues and could strengthen Google’s dominance of digital advertising.

Google’s alternative to cookies called Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) identifies groups of people with common interests without individualized tracking.

Some businesses have objected to the Google plan claiming it will force more advertisers into its “walled garden.”

European publishers said the new system would create a “black box” that would keep crucial market information away from all players in the digital publishing world except for Google.

Some analysts argued that even though FLoC would not identify individual users, it would reveal enough data that could allow people to be tracked.

“We plan to continue to work with the web community to create more private approaches to key areas, including ad measurement, delivering relevant ads and content, and fraud detection,” Goel said.

  • bio
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • latest posts

ZONNTECH.COM uses both Facebook and Disqus comment systems to make it easier for you to contribute. We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles and blog posts. All comments should be relevant to the topic. By posting, you agree to our Privacy Policy. We are committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion, so we ask you to avoid personal attacks, name-calling, foul language or other inappropriate behavior. Please keep your comments relevant and respectful. By leaving the ‘Post to Facebook’ box selected – when using Facebook comment system – your comment will be published to your Facebook profile in addition to the space below. If you encounter a comment that is abusive, click the “X” in the upper right corner of the Facebook comment box to report spam or abuse. You can also email us.